It’s not just a job: Using the power of social to build your best life.

I’ve been doing a lot of talks lately here locally–I just spoke to the Omaha Business Women’s Network, at the Midwest Entrepreneurship Conference, this week I’m doing a session for Omaha Fashion Week about how to pitch, and next week I’m leading a networking session at Infotec and speaking to a classroom at the University of Nebraska-Omaha. Phew! I really enjoy it–I like feeling energy from a crowd, and I like learning about the projects others are working on. I like to hear from the audience about what is challenging them, what they really want to do. It’s also kind of a fun way to use my experience BEFORE Princess Lasertron–before sewing–when I worked as a public speaking coach with my communication degree.

One common theme I’ve noticed in each talk I do–whether it’s to college students or 45-year-old businesswomen–is that there’s always a portion of the audience that is biding their time in a comfortable job waiting for the perfect time to finally do whatever they’d rather be doing. Just waiting. I’ve heard so many people say things like “It’s just a job. Once I’m doing what I really want to do, I’ll be unstoppable.” My message is that it’s not just a job–it’s not a rehearsal for a cool life you’re gonna earn later. Which is why I put together a business series for this week called…It’s Not Just a Job!

Maybe you feel like you’re biding your time too, or maybe you have a job you love love love, but you need help forming a strategy to really start killing it in your position. Or maybe you want to inspire other people in your office to work as hard as you do so your team can be more successful.

The whole idea is that you can channel your passion in the right ways–relevant, productive ways–to have more professional happiness. Waiting for your life to start is bullshit–just because you are working for someone else for now doesn’t mean your actions, attitude, and relationships aren’t important. The lessons I’m sharing this week in this series will help you prepare wisely and start your new venture with an advantage, and they’ll also help you leave your current job with great relationships and a great reputation when you’re finally ready to put your two weeks in.

So here’s the schedule of topics…
Tuesday: Be proud of your identity. (Because it’s your key to the party!)
Wednesday: Work smart and work hard.
Thursday: Put your content on the right platforms.
Friday: Care about quality and experience. (Don’t gross people out.)

See you tomorrow! Bring your best attitude!
xo
meg

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2 thoughts on “It’s not just a job: Using the power of social to build your best life.”

  1. Sarah says:

    Fantastic topic! I look forward to the posts this week!

  2. Toni M says:

    Great post! Thank you for that perspective.


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Alice Elfie’s Day Off

Alice and I stayed home today so we could start making presents for our family. It's hard to find much time to be together and do any of that between getting off work and bedtime, so we both took a day off! We listened to the Mariah Carey holiday Pandora station all day and had personal pan pizzas delivered for lunch, and ate all the cookies we wanted from a cookie exchange we went to last weekend. Here's what we made, including links!

OOTD: Clothes to covet

Today Alice and I are staying home to work on all of our Christmas gifts together! With my new work schedule, there isn't a lot of time between work and bed to finish any meaningful projects together, so we both took the day off to make and wrap all of our gifts. One thing on my gift list is this outfit. If we don't sell out of my size before the holidays, I'll definitely be buying it from the store. Usually I just buy whatever I want as things come in or order extra for myself, but during the holidays I want to give all of our extra inventory a chance to sell at full price before I snatch it up.

Clark & Company: Young guns in the Omaha music spotlight

This summer was the first time I heard Clark & Company’s music. I was at a friend’s house for a big party and the place was buzzing with lively discussions between friends reuniting and new introductions being made. I heard Clark & Company in the background of all this fun, and it was the kind of sound that you at first think is coming through some speakers somewhere. Soon, singer Sophie Clark’s beautiful, soulful voice caught my ear, and I began paying more attention to the music than the conversation.

Starting a Storefront

So I've never worked clothing retail before. In college I worked at a record store for a while, but it was pretty much exactly like the movie High Fidelity and thus not a legit retail experience. As we were preparing to open our first retail location for the Hello Holiday offices, everyone who knows me kept saying stuff like, "Well, I hope you can handle retail." "I think you're gonna find that running a physical store is a lot different." "Well, I look forward to hearing how THAT goes." It's like when you're a parent and you say stuff like, "I'm planning on taking my kid to work most days," and other parents knowingly go, "Oh, YOU'LLLLLL see."

I opened a store. Here’s what it looks like.

On November 25th, right before Thanksgiving, Sarah and I opened Hello Holiday's first brick-and-mortar location. When we started Hello Holiday, we had no intention of opening a physical store, but one thing we are both good at is seeing opportunities when they arise and reacting to them quickly to take advantage of them. We had had some success with local pop-up shop events, and when a retail space came over in one of Omaha's coolest neighborhoods, we knew we had to take it. We're excited for the store because it'll give us the space we need to grow. The front is the retail showroom, the back will be our offices when we finish construction, and our growing online fulfillment operations take place out of the full basement. With this space, we'll also have the opportunity to carry more independent designers from all over the world and take more risks with designers that would be harder to sell online. When customers can feel the clothing, see the lining, feel the zipper, see how it looks on, they're more likely to feel that emotional connection to these designers. It's not just a connection to an object, to an item of clothing, but a connection to a maker--a designer--who may live thousands of miles away. It's someone we believe in and support, and we're exposing their work to hundreds of thousands of new supporters through our store--both online and now with this physical location.
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