Keep your brushes clean and your face cleaner. How to wash your makeup brushes!

So this sounds gross but I never really washed my makeup brushes until a few months ago. I tried to, but because I was using a crappy method, I couldn’t tell if the brushes were really getting clean. They always seemed either still soapy or still dirty. I couldn’t figure out how people were washing their brushes easily and getting them clean and fluffy again.

Finally I figured out how to do it and I wanted to share. Thanks to my husband for taking these photos the other day when I was washin’ em all up. You need baby shampoo and a shallow, clear dish.

1. Put a tiny pea-sized amount of shampoo into the clear dish. A little tiny dab. Hardly any.

2. Add the tiniest littlest trickle of water.

3. Gently swish the brush around in the shampoo and water mixture. Try not to smash the bristles around in the bowl, just keep brushing and swirling.

4. Add a little more water and continue to lather the brush. The water should be looking pretty grody at this point–that’s good, that means the makeup is coming out.

5. Remove the brush and rinse the dirty water out of the bowl. Refill the bowl with about an inch of clean water, and continue to brush and swirl the brush around. Continue to rinse the dirty water and keep swirling the brush until the rinse is clear.

6. Instead of squeezing the bristles out with your hand, gently flick the water off by holding the brush in your fist and tapping your fist on the edge of the sink. You can tap the brush, but I didn’t want to risk damaging mine.

7. Gently re-shape the bristles and lay them on a rolled towel facing down so the water drains out of the ferrule (the metal part connecting the bristles to the handle).

That’s it!
It’s not rocket science.
But it was a big “aha” moment for me once I tried this technique to wash my brushes.

After I had Alice, I developed rosacea on my cheeks (Any other moms experience this? I guess it’s pretty common.) in addition to the mild acne I already had. I treated the rosacea for a long time as if it was acne, and I finally realized that it’s a totally different thing. Now I’m on the path to getting the redness and bumps under control, and washing my makeup brushes regularly is a part of it. As I go through my treatment regimen more, I’ll let you all know what else works! This brush thing though, I should have been doing for years.

xx

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four × = 32

3 thoughts on “Keep your brushes clean and your face cleaner. How to wash your makeup brushes!”

  1. kim says:

    i use mastey… i use mastey to also wash my face,,, and when i have a lot my body too.

  2. Kara says:

    I also use a gentle handsoap and that seems to work well too! Even still, I should clean them more often…

  3. Amanda Riley says:

    Awesome tips! I never thought of rolling the towel up so the brushes faced down. I always laid them flat. Tisk tisk.


two + = 7

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